Shirt Pressing

Shirts are a pain because its hard to train a presser…

Shirts are a pain because it takes a while to train a presser. Pressing shirts is more of a specialty than other items. So much so that we sometimes over-pay a shirt presser just because we have found someone that is good and we want to keep them on the staff. If a presser does an inferior press job on a shirt, the touch up necessary may take longer than it took to press the shirt (correctly on incorrectly) in the first place. This is important and contributes heavily to the making shirts a royal pain. Conversely, when an inspector finds a pressing defect on, say, a pair of pants, the touch-up necessary to bring the garment from unacceptable to acceptable often takes mere seconds. A quick pass with the all-steam iron or dancing the pants – still on the hanger – over a puffer and you’re done. Try that with shirts. It will yield poor results.


Pads & Covers

Pads and Covers

Pads and Covers on Laundry equipment are very much misunderstood, so I thought that we should talk about them this month.

Whenever I visit a plant, there is about a 90% chance that my client and I have a conversation that goes something like this:

Client:  What causes this kind of wrinkle (or pressing flaw)?

Me:  Your pads (or your steel mesh) need to be replaced.

Client:  But I just changed these.

Me:  Its time to replace them again.

Sorry about that.  Pads and covers don’t last as long as you think.  But, if you do the arithmetic, you will find that the cost of pads and covers adds very little to the cost of shirts.


Bad Cuff Pressing

From my desk here, perhaps hundreds or thousands of miles from your shirt unit, it is my job to help you improve the quality of your shirts and to increase your profitability.  That isn’t always an easy task.  But today, I’d like to talk about two really bad things that may be happening from time to time.  Knowledge of this will go a long way towards eliminating the problem. 

  1. What is the most ugly pressing error that you can do on a shirt?
  2. What part of a shirt is most often over-looked by an inspector?

When I had my big wholesale plant years ago, a very ugly pressing error came to light and it happened to be on one of my own shirts.  I was not happy.  I called a meeting of the inspection staff to discuss this with them.  I remember using push-pins to display my shirt on the bulletin board in the meeting room.  I was pretty lucky at that particular time.  I had an inspection staff that was dedicated and concerned.  They readily agreed to address my problem du jour.  Minutes later, at their job stations, my inspectors whined about this problem area.  The pressers needed to be re-trained and supervised.  The problem area was more “common” than I thought.  I still was not happy.


  • Archives:

  • Categories

    Copyright © 1996-2018 Tailwind Systems. All rights reserved.
    Designed and Hosted by Direct Net Hosting | Contact Us at support@directnethosting.com